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Peace Day 2012 Ceasefire Call

Towards Just and Sustainable Peace:

Declare a Peace Day Ceasefire!

A Citizens’ Call for a September 21 Ceasefire

PDF VERSION

On the UN-declared International Day of Peace, also called a Global Day of Ceasefire and Non-Violence – September 21, we urge the Government of the Philippines and the CPP-NPA-NDF to declare a 24-hour ceasefire. The ongoing ceasefire between the GPH and the MILF must be especially be upheld on that date.
We ask that the guns be silenced in our country on Peace Day, in solidarity with all who seek to end violent conflicts around the globe.

“If we all unite, together we can create the largest global reduction of violence ever recorded on one day” –Peace One Day

As peace advocates from diverse political, cultural, faith and social backgrounds, we call for a cessation of hostilities in order to highlight the urgent need for peace.

We support the ongoing peace processes that aim to resolve through political negotiations the decades-long armed conflicts in the Philippines. We are determined to accompany the process toward signing of peace agreements and more importantly, in the implementation of these peace agreements.

In the Philippines, September 21 is more known as the day when Martial Law was declared, that we remember by vowing, “Never again.” On this 40th year since the declaration of Martial Law, we still suffer its legacy of armed conflicts and stubborn roots of injustice and poverty.

Therefore our call for peace is not just for the absence of war but further for the presence of “jobs and justice, food and freedom, land and liberation”. One of the lessons of our struggle against dictatorship is that a durable peace will be built only with the fullness of human rights and dignity.

On September 21, a day of ceasefire will be a moment marking our common commitment to building a just and sustainable peace.

WE SUPPORT THE PEACE PROCESSES. WE WANT A JUST AND LASTING PEACE. DECLARE CEASEFIRE ON PEACE DAY!

Generation Peace, Mindanao Solidarity Network, Peace Day Committee Waging Peace Philippines – GPPAC Southeast Asia

*If you wish to include your organization to our peace day ceasefire call, 
leave a comment below.

Peace Day 2012 (plans)

September 2012, Philippines–GenPeace spearheads localized celebrations of the International Day of Peace in the Philippines. Youth leaders and organizations take the lead in raising awareness on the country’s armed conflict, and challenging this generation to support peacebuilding initiatives. In a country with two 40-year old forgotten armed conflicts, the youth can be a potent force in bridging the peace gaps.

With the theme, “Just and Sustainable Peace for Our Future: Support the Peace Processes!”, GenPeace through its member-organizations, school partners, friends and communities, prepared numerous initiatives for the peace month of September.

September 21, apart from being the commemoration of the declaration of Martial Law 40 years ago, is also the UN-declared International Day of Peace, Ceasefire and Non-violence. The youth network aims to: 1)  educate the public on the Peace Day, the issues and root causes of armed conflict in the Philippines; 2)  promote participation and contribution from the young generation; 3) campaign for a 24-hour unilateral declaration of ceasefires, and; 4) gather broader support for the peace processes in the country.

Activities

GenPeace and its partner organizations have lined-up a month-long set of activities for September. Some of the plans are:

1.       Simultaneous Peace Day Celebrations can provide the space for  raising awareness that there is a global day of peace, ceasefire and non-violence. During this day, we join the rest of the world in aspiring for peace but also, concretely working towards that goal through education, communications and media, networking, policy advocacy, dialogues, and projects with conflict-affected localities.

  • Cagayan Valley Region
  • Manila
  • Quezon City
  • CARAGA
  • Cebu
  • Iloilo
  • Davao City
  • Samar and Leyte

2.       Ceasefire Campaign. We are asking the government and NDF and MILF to unilaterally declare ceasefires on 21 September. We are also part of global peace day ceasefire call.

3.       LGU Engagement: Peace Day Resolutions/Ordinances

We are asking local governments to pass resolutions and/or ordinances supporting peace day and the peace day ceasefire, and to fully support the peace talks. We believe that localized declarations of support increases the chances for convergence at the local level–supporting the conflict-affected communities and the grassroots–where peacebuilding matters most.

4.       Fundraising: Peace of Cake

The Peace of Cake is a fundraising to help us achieve our goal: raise awareness on peace, and support the localized peace initiatives nationwide.

We’re raising Php 200,000 for the nationwide activities of the youth network. Buy our cakes, 100% of proceeds will be for the month-long peace advocacy and education activities.

5.       Campus Tours: Peace Forums. This will be the education campaign of GenPeace for the Peace Month and beyond. The forums target students from different universities and seek to update the youth on the peace talks, raise understanding of the conflict issues in the country, the primacy of the peace talks, and challenge the youth to become peace advocates.

6.  Give Peace a Shot: Photo and Signature Petition for Supporting Peace Processes and the 24-hour Global Ceasefire

We join the world in calling for a Global Day of Truce through localized unilateral ceasefire declarations of the government through its Armed Forces of the Philippines, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and the National Democratic Front. Ceasefires are often construed as pacifist and a counter-insurgency measure, but we want to institutionalize the Peace Day Ceasefire nationwide and throughout the world. A day of ceasefire can give the people a day of respite from all the violence and take time to reflect on peace. Everyone can be nourished by a day of ceasefire as the longer struggle towards a just and sustainable peace continues thereafter.

Draft Executive Summary: GenPeace General Assembly

Download the PDF of the: Executive summary gen peace ga

Members of the National Board had assessed the activities in accordance to their alignment with GenPeace core thrusts. The members had closely examined the work of GenPeace and said that the projects had triumphantly inculcated the value of peace consciousness especially among the youth. They recognized the network’s efforts to initiate Peace Education programs among localities particularly in the South. More so, they have said that through the different activities and projects of the network, the youth became more deeply involved in the activities concerning peace. They also applauded the region-wide connections established by the network linking all youths from different regions to work for the cause of peace. They have also stated that due to the engagement of GenPeace programs in their localities, the programs of their organizations had been more peace – focused and the youth were more empowered and their passion for peace was reawakened.

 

 

View more documents from GenPeace.

Peace is everyone’s business

Ed Garcia, one of our esteemed GenPeace mentors, also known as ‘Master Yoda’ is not just inspiring GenPeace Youth network. In fact, he has mentored and inspired countless peace advocates from all walks of life. Below is Peter Perfecto’s article published by PDI. –Editors Note

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By: 

 

One mentor in my life who probably most influenced my decisions in taking roads less travelled is Ed Garcia. Ed has always championed peace and human rights not only in the Philippines but across the globe, having worked extensively with Amnesty International and having been a part of International Alert for many years now. Though based in London, Ed manages to return to the Philippines regularly to help push our peace process forward even just one little step at a time. He never tires of the effort, always reminding me that peace is everyone’s business.

During his last visit to the Philippines, Ed stayed for over three months to meet various stakeholders in the peace process, help organize the Waging Peace in the Philippines Conference 2011, and even get a small group that included next-generation youth peace leaders to dialogue via Skype technology with a leader of one of the parties in our decades-old conflict. That was Ed’s other consistent message to those who would listen: Keep the dialogue always going and make sure the youth are always part of that dialogue. He, of course, made sure to seek me as the representative of the constructive voice of business on national issues, the Makati Business Club (MBC). He understandably wanted MBC to make the peace process its business, too, and subsequently help get more of the private sector involved.

I most certainly agree with Ed that business groups need to become part of the peace process. The private sector has been both bane and boon to the peace process. In line with the continuing evolution of corporate social responsibility, however, it must become part of the solution and not one of the roots of the conflict. The private sector must become genuine nation-builders and, subsequently, effective peace-builders.

In a 2011 National Caucus on conflict-sensitive business practice, International Alert (IA) explained that “the entry of extractive, energy, and agribusiness companies in rural areas across the Philippines creates both opportunities and risks for improving the living standards of the poor and excluded in our society and the ability of local authorities to govern local economies.” Some of the opportunities highlighted were new jobs, new skills and new livelihoods, as well as enhanced revenue sources for local government units. IA further explained that “there are liability risks that resonate in the eruption of violence and conflict in the areas where companies operate; the increased incidence of illegal ejection or displacement of communities; the inducement of graft and corruption; and the use of abusive security forces and the provision of the means to kill.” The private sector must work to enhance the opportunities and aggressively act to mitigate the risks.

To link arms with the various peace advocates, business can support the following Easter Proposals to Wage Peace that can serve as the first steps leading to the resumption of peace negotiations between the government and the National Democratic Front (NDF):

1. Easter Talks: Convene facilitated direct talks (or “nontalks”) between the respective chairs of the negotiating panels in the period of Easter (or before) to ensure that conditions are established for the resumption of formal peace negotiations.

2. Easter Releases: Release at least four or five people relevant to the peace process who will somehow be “a collective force for good” in assisting in the discussions on the substantive issues on the agenda of the peace talks. Accept the offer of the Philippine Ecumenical Peace Platform and other civic and religious leaders to receive those released either in cognizance or to provide safe conduct for a temporary stay abroad.

3. Easter Pause: In the spirit of Easter and in the spirit of magnanimity and reciprocity, desist from armed offensives during the period of the talks. The duration and terms of reference of this initial Easter Pause may be negotiated as the talks progress. Establish independent capacities to more effectively verify violations both of human rights and of the provisional truce that has arisen from this Easter opportunity.

The Waging Peace Convenors led by the likes of Ed Garcia, Karen Tañada and Gus Miclat made these proposals last Feb. 27 during the commemoration of the late Sen. Jose W. Diokno’s death anniversary. They called on the government and the NDF to “negotiate a political settlement and pay tribute to the late Ka Pepe Diokno who lived and worked to build a nation worthy of our children.”

The business sector may not be ready to fully support the above calls, but I am certain that a just and lasting peace makes good business sense to all in the sector.

Last Jan. 20, the Eisenhower Fellows Association of the Philippines sponsored a forum on business opportunities in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. Amidst the conflict, business opportunities were highlighted and the challenges discussed. While conflict seems to not have prevented private investments in Mindanao, the continuing security and land access problems have been key constraints to urgently needed investments. Companies like La Frutera, Dole Philippines Fruits, ArDex Corp., Sumitomo, Mega Sardines, Shemberg, Agumil, Filipinas, Bj Coco Mill, Granexport and NorMin Veggies are successfully operating in conflict areas in Mindanao. More will most certainly venture into the region if the peace process would just reach a final political settlement. But that will only happen if we all make peace our business.

Peter Angelo V. Perfecto is the executive director of the Makati Business Club.

GenPeace Reps Skypes with Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma of the NDF

Asian Institute of Management, Makati City–Selected members of GenPeace took part in a historic skype dialogue with Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma, prominent leaders of the National Democratic Front. During the skype meeting last March 2, 2012, the youth’s calls during the GenPeace General Assembly were highlighted by the GenPeace representatives. Mirma Tica, Gerald Eustaquio and Kaye Limpiado presented the youth’s calls for: 1) Easter Peace Talks, 2) Protect the Environment; and 3) End Impunity. (click here for the GenPeace Statement for the GPH-NDF Talks)

GenPeace reps met (cyberly) with Louis Jalandoni of the NDF. The youth called for the resumption of talks and fully supports the peace process as the ‘way to go’. At the background is the video-beamed image of Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma from Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Jalandoni welcomed the youth’s calls particularly on the protection of the environment and the ending of the climate of impunity in the country. Regarding the call for peace talks to resume, he said that the NDF also aspires for a just and lasting peace in the country. He further encouraged the youth to advocate for peace to the President and even the security sector.

The GenPeace representatives were invited by the peace civil society community under Waging Peace Philippines and through Prof. Ed Garcia of the International Alert. Some of the other dialogue participants were Karen Tanada of GZO Peace Institute, Sr. Ma. Arnold Noel and Joeven Reyes of Sulong CARHRIHL, former Senator Bobby Tanada, and Gus Miclat from the Initiatives for International Dialogue.

GenPeace Statement for the GPH and the NDF: ‘We will redouble our efforts for peace.’

GenPeace members met and discussed ways to support and promote the peace talks in the country. The youth network also recognizes the different manifestations of violence in the grassroots communities--from poverty to frat and gang wars. The network resolves to combat the climate of impunity and violence with that of the culture of peace.


 GENERATION PEACE:  2012 RESOLVE

Generation Peace, meeting in general assembly on the eve of the 26th anniversary of the 1986 People’s Power, resolves to redouble our efforts to pursue peace in diverse parts of the country.  We will do our part in galvanizing youth voices in urban and rural areas, in schools and in streets, in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.  We will network with other sectors, in particular, with our teachers, with women, indigenous peoples, and with religious, business, political and community leaders.

We call on the leaders and the negotiating panels of the Government and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines to resume peace talks in the period of Easter – the season of resurrection and re-awakening.  To do so, we urge the following:

  • 1.      Undertake Easter Releases of Selected Detainees Relevant to the Negotiations!
  • 2.      Protect the Environment Now. Do so More Vigorously!
  • 3.      End Impunity!

We call on both sides to do so for the sake of future generations.  We cannot wait any longer.  These talks have been protracted enough, and we want to eliminate more victims of a war without end.  We ask both sides to do what it takes to overcome obstacles.  During the period of talks we call on both parties to suspend offensive military operations to create a climate more conducive to restore trust and the construction of a more peaceful future.

 

From Generation Peace General Assembly,

Successor Generation of Peace Advocates

February 24, 2012

 

 

SIGNED:

Members of the Generation Peace General Assembly

University of Eastern Philippines Communication Association

FEU ACP3 Peace Tayo

Center for Peace Education Miriam College

Pax Christi Miriam College

Balay Rehabilitation Center

United Youth for Peace and Development

Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute

Sulong CARHRIHL

UNESCO Young Professionals Club

PNU-UNESCO Club

United Nations Youth Association of the Philippines

Sobusteha Youth Association

Akbayan Youth –Davao

Peace Advocates Zamboanga

SINAG Political Organization

Student Commission on Election, De La Salle University Dasmarinas

CARAGA Youth Leaders Network

Teduray Lambangian Youth and Students Association

Tirmizy E. Abdullah

Edito T. Ebol Jr.

Josiluther B. Nacario

Gerald Matthew E. Eustaquio

Brenfred N. Romero

Abraham Dolindo

Bernadette Fernandez

Ian Villanueva

Hazeline M. Panganiban

Nina Sarah D. Francisco

Xyren Moren Magbuhos

Jerome Requidan

Marc Zeus Chee

Marylou Suitado

Mary Angeli Bataycan

Catrice Butterworth

Rechie J. Tugawin

Allen John Lira

Jayson Tingson

Victoria Kathleen Mae

Maria Theresa Angelica Bustria

Kristel Georgia Mendoza

Ricky Batitao

Albert Putong

Youth Solidarity For Peace.

Robert Basco

 

 

 

One Million Voices for Peace Gains International Support

ONE MILLION VOICES FOR PEACE CAMPAIGN GAINS INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT

AMID CHALLENGES TO THE PEACE PROCESS

The campaign to gather considerable citizen support to the peace talks between the Goverment of the Philippines (GPH) and the National Democratic Front (NDF) and Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has gained added momentum with the endorsement of the campaign by the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC).

 

The public opinion backlash to the recent encounter in Albarka, Basilan and the continuing impasse over the implementation of the Joint Agreement on Safety and Immunity Guarantees (JASIG) emphasize the need to mobilize citizen support for dialogue and consensus building.

The One Million Voices for Peace in the Philippines Campaign aims to gather the support of people from all over the Philippines and the rest of world, to signify their desire for an end to the conflict in the country and present these to the conflict actors to press them to work for a peaceful, just and comprehensive political settlement to the armed conflicts in the Philippines.

GPPAC is a global movement that seeks to leverage civil society initiatives and press governments and rebel movements to utilize dialogue as the more sustainable mode of resolving the roots of armed conflicts. It works to strengthen civil society networks for peace and security by linking local, national, regional, and global levels of action. It engages with governments, the UN system and regional organizations to create policies and programs that promote peace building. More GPPAC information is available at: www.gppac.net

 

Among the personalities who have signified support to the peace campaign are:

Emmanuel Bombande

Chair of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) and Executive Director of the West Africa Network on Peacebuilding (WANEP)

Prof. Andres Serbin

Chair of the International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect

Melanie Greenberg

Chair of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, USA

Peter Van Tuil

Executive Director, GPPAC Foundation

Lisa Schircht

3P Human Security, USA

Grace Maima

Africa Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD)

Andrei Kameshlikov

Non-Violence International, Russia

Mauricio Salazar

SERAPAZ, Mexico

Lia van Broekhoven

CORDAID, Netherlands

Peter Woodrow

Co-Director, Reflecting on Peace Practice Project, CDA, USA

Bibi van Ginkel

Fellow, International Centre for Counter Terrorism, Netherlands

John Filsum

3P Human Security, USA

Justine Brouillaud

Consultant GPPAC

Hitomi Kubo

Consultant, Human Security Unit, UN

Anne Kahl

Analyst, Conflict Prevention and Recovery Team, UN

 

A website for the One Million Voices for Peace allows for the “voices” to be expressed in a variety of ways: including your name and email on the form provided, subscribing to the OMV4P YouTube channel, “likes” from Facebook accounts, and following the campaign on Twitter. Please visit the One Million Voices for Peace in Mindanao website, and add your name to the “voices” calling for peace in Mindanao.

Primer on Armed Conflict in the Philippines

Mayroong dalawang malalaking armadong tunggalian sa Pilipinas na nagsimula sa maagang bahagi ng dekada 1970.

– Ang pakikibaka ng Communist Party of the Philippines- New Peoples’ Army- National Democratic Front (CPP-NPA-NDF) laban sa pamahalaan ng Pilipinas

– Ang pakikibaka ng Bangsamoro para sa  kasarinlan o Right to Self Determination, na sinimulan ng Moro National Liberation Front  (MNLF) at pinagpapatuloy sa ngayon ng Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF)

A young war evacuee holds his message of peace. Although the Mindanao armed conflict features a low intensity type of warfare, the ‘all-out war’ declarations and skirmishes have caused hundreds of deaths and thousands of displaced persons in 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2008. (Nartea and PhilANSA, copyright 2005)

Prosesong Pangkapayapaan

Upang maresolba ang mga nasabing tunggalian, ang pangunahing pamamaraan ng pamahalaan ng Pilipinas (Government of the Philippines or GPH) ay peace talks o usapang pangkapayapaan. Sinasabayan din ito ng mga programang reporma at pangkaunlaran sa mga apektadong lugar. Gumagampit pa rin ng pwersang militar and GPH ayon sa Internal Peace and Security Plan ng Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP). Ang kabuuang stratehiyang pangkapayapaan at seguridad ng kasalukuyang administrasyon ay nakalathala sa “Chapter 9 Peace and Security” ng Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016.

Read the rest of this entry

Peace Day and Campaign 2011

September 21 is the UN-declared International Day of Peace. In the Philippines the youth network Generation Peace takes this opportunity to: Raise awareness on peace and the armed conflicts; Enlist public support for peace; Ask for a day of ceasefire from all armed groups and the government; Provide creative spaces for peacebuilding.

There are 2 Ways to Celebrate: K

1. Attend a Peace Day Celebration near you. 

GenPeace is coordinating simultaneous celebrations in 6 key cities and 8 indigenous peoples communities around the country. The areas are: NCR, CARAGA, Maguindanao-ARMM, North Luzon, Iloilo, and Cebu. Indigenous peoples communities of Dumagats, Talaandig, Agta, Teduray and Lambangian will also have community peace celebrations/rituals.

Everyone will celebrate on 21 September, with events ranging from interfaith rituals, sports events, forum, film screenings, roundtable discussions, peace ceremony, etc.

The NCR celebration will be on 21 September at the QC Circle, from 8AM-2PM. The theme for the NCR celebration will be sports and Pinoy games. See https://www.facebook.com/peacedayproject for details.

You may also want to celebrate your own school or community event!

2.  Join the ‘Give Peace a Shot: Peace Photo Petition’

•WHAT: Peace Photo Petition

•WHEN & WHERE: August to December; Nationwide
•WHY: Support the Peace Talks; Ask for 21 September Ceasefire Declaration from all groups; Tool for Education and Lobbying
HOW:

LIKE:  GivePeaceaShot Facebook Page. UPLOAD a photo with your peace message. TAG the GivePeaceaShot Page

Update Report on the GPH-CPP/NPA/NDF Peace Process

Alexander Padilla
GPH Panel Chair for the Talks with the CPP-NPA-NDF
Forum on Peace and Security
March 3, 2011

Download the file here.