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10 Things: Why Should We Pursue the Bangsamoro Peace Talks?

 We are all brothers and sisters not by blood, but by our tears, our suffering, our mourning. I am enraged by the violence in Mamasapano, but will never call for an all-out war. Many who beat on their war drums know nothing about being in a war zone. It is easy to be a commando on Facebook or a Rambo with a signature espresso drink. But war is ugly. Very, very ugly. Uglier than how movies portray it. I’ve seen firsthand the aftermath of the MoA-AD in 2008.

While the BBL did not in any way trigger the senseless deaths in Mamasapano, it became the primary casualty of a botched military operation against terrorism. Make no mistake, terrorism in all forms should be condemned but having the BBL threatened after the Mamasapano clash loses sight of the opportune moment to build peace and turn swords into ploughshares. Here are some perspectives on why we should see the bigger picture and pursue peace along with our cries for justice.

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GenPeace Reps Skypes with Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma of the NDF

Asian Institute of Management, Makati City–Selected members of GenPeace took part in a historic skype dialogue with Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma, prominent leaders of the National Democratic Front. During the skype meeting last March 2, 2012, the youth’s calls during the GenPeace General Assembly were highlighted by the GenPeace representatives. Mirma Tica, Gerald Eustaquio and Kaye Limpiado presented the youth’s calls for: 1) Easter Peace Talks, 2) Protect the Environment; and 3) End Impunity. (click here for the GenPeace Statement for the GPH-NDF Talks)

GenPeace reps met (cyberly) with Louis Jalandoni of the NDF. The youth called for the resumption of talks and fully supports the peace process as the ‘way to go’. At the background is the video-beamed image of Louis Jalandoni and Coni Ledesma from Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Jalandoni welcomed the youth’s calls particularly on the protection of the environment and the ending of the climate of impunity in the country. Regarding the call for peace talks to resume, he said that the NDF also aspires for a just and lasting peace in the country. He further encouraged the youth to advocate for peace to the President and even the security sector.

The GenPeace representatives were invited by the peace civil society community under Waging Peace Philippines and through Prof. Ed Garcia of the International Alert. Some of the other dialogue participants were Karen Tanada of GZO Peace Institute, Sr. Ma. Arnold Noel and Joeven Reyes of Sulong CARHRIHL, former Senator Bobby Tanada, and Gus Miclat from the Initiatives for International Dialogue.

GenPeace Statement for the GPH and the NDF: ‘We will redouble our efforts for peace.’

GenPeace members met and discussed ways to support and promote the peace talks in the country. The youth network also recognizes the different manifestations of violence in the grassroots communities--from poverty to frat and gang wars. The network resolves to combat the climate of impunity and violence with that of the culture of peace.


 GENERATION PEACE:  2012 RESOLVE

Generation Peace, meeting in general assembly on the eve of the 26th anniversary of the 1986 People’s Power, resolves to redouble our efforts to pursue peace in diverse parts of the country.  We will do our part in galvanizing youth voices in urban and rural areas, in schools and in streets, in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.  We will network with other sectors, in particular, with our teachers, with women, indigenous peoples, and with religious, business, political and community leaders.

We call on the leaders and the negotiating panels of the Government and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines to resume peace talks in the period of Easter – the season of resurrection and re-awakening.  To do so, we urge the following:

  • 1.      Undertake Easter Releases of Selected Detainees Relevant to the Negotiations!
  • 2.      Protect the Environment Now. Do so More Vigorously!
  • 3.      End Impunity!

We call on both sides to do so for the sake of future generations.  We cannot wait any longer.  These talks have been protracted enough, and we want to eliminate more victims of a war without end.  We ask both sides to do what it takes to overcome obstacles.  During the period of talks we call on both parties to suspend offensive military operations to create a climate more conducive to restore trust and the construction of a more peaceful future.

 

From Generation Peace General Assembly,

Successor Generation of Peace Advocates

February 24, 2012

 

 

SIGNED:

Members of the Generation Peace General Assembly

University of Eastern Philippines Communication Association

FEU ACP3 Peace Tayo

Center for Peace Education Miriam College

Pax Christi Miriam College

Balay Rehabilitation Center

United Youth for Peace and Development

Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute

Sulong CARHRIHL

UNESCO Young Professionals Club

PNU-UNESCO Club

United Nations Youth Association of the Philippines

Sobusteha Youth Association

Akbayan Youth –Davao

Peace Advocates Zamboanga

SINAG Political Organization

Student Commission on Election, De La Salle University Dasmarinas

CARAGA Youth Leaders Network

Teduray Lambangian Youth and Students Association

Tirmizy E. Abdullah

Edito T. Ebol Jr.

Josiluther B. Nacario

Gerald Matthew E. Eustaquio

Brenfred N. Romero

Abraham Dolindo

Bernadette Fernandez

Ian Villanueva

Hazeline M. Panganiban

Nina Sarah D. Francisco

Xyren Moren Magbuhos

Jerome Requidan

Marc Zeus Chee

Marylou Suitado

Mary Angeli Bataycan

Catrice Butterworth

Rechie J. Tugawin

Allen John Lira

Jayson Tingson

Victoria Kathleen Mae

Maria Theresa Angelica Bustria

Kristel Georgia Mendoza

Ricky Batitao

Albert Putong

Youth Solidarity For Peace.

Robert Basco

 

 

 

One Million Voices for Peace Gains International Support

ONE MILLION VOICES FOR PEACE CAMPAIGN GAINS INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT

AMID CHALLENGES TO THE PEACE PROCESS

The campaign to gather considerable citizen support to the peace talks between the Goverment of the Philippines (GPH) and the National Democratic Front (NDF) and Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has gained added momentum with the endorsement of the campaign by the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC).

 

The public opinion backlash to the recent encounter in Albarka, Basilan and the continuing impasse over the implementation of the Joint Agreement on Safety and Immunity Guarantees (JASIG) emphasize the need to mobilize citizen support for dialogue and consensus building.

The One Million Voices for Peace in the Philippines Campaign aims to gather the support of people from all over the Philippines and the rest of world, to signify their desire for an end to the conflict in the country and present these to the conflict actors to press them to work for a peaceful, just and comprehensive political settlement to the armed conflicts in the Philippines.

GPPAC is a global movement that seeks to leverage civil society initiatives and press governments and rebel movements to utilize dialogue as the more sustainable mode of resolving the roots of armed conflicts. It works to strengthen civil society networks for peace and security by linking local, national, regional, and global levels of action. It engages with governments, the UN system and regional organizations to create policies and programs that promote peace building. More GPPAC information is available at: www.gppac.net

 

Among the personalities who have signified support to the peace campaign are:

Emmanuel Bombande

Chair of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) and Executive Director of the West Africa Network on Peacebuilding (WANEP)

Prof. Andres Serbin

Chair of the International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect

Melanie Greenberg

Chair of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, USA

Peter Van Tuil

Executive Director, GPPAC Foundation

Lisa Schircht

3P Human Security, USA

Grace Maima

Africa Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes (ACCORD)

Andrei Kameshlikov

Non-Violence International, Russia

Mauricio Salazar

SERAPAZ, Mexico

Lia van Broekhoven

CORDAID, Netherlands

Peter Woodrow

Co-Director, Reflecting on Peace Practice Project, CDA, USA

Bibi van Ginkel

Fellow, International Centre for Counter Terrorism, Netherlands

John Filsum

3P Human Security, USA

Justine Brouillaud

Consultant GPPAC

Hitomi Kubo

Consultant, Human Security Unit, UN

Anne Kahl

Analyst, Conflict Prevention and Recovery Team, UN

 

A website for the One Million Voices for Peace allows for the “voices” to be expressed in a variety of ways: including your name and email on the form provided, subscribing to the OMV4P YouTube channel, “likes” from Facebook accounts, and following the campaign on Twitter. Please visit the One Million Voices for Peace in Mindanao website, and add your name to the “voices” calling for peace in Mindanao.

Primer on Armed Conflict in the Philippines

Mayroong dalawang malalaking armadong tunggalian sa Pilipinas na nagsimula sa maagang bahagi ng dekada 1970.

– Ang pakikibaka ng Communist Party of the Philippines- New Peoples’ Army- National Democratic Front (CPP-NPA-NDF) laban sa pamahalaan ng Pilipinas

– Ang pakikibaka ng Bangsamoro para sa  kasarinlan o Right to Self Determination, na sinimulan ng Moro National Liberation Front  (MNLF) at pinagpapatuloy sa ngayon ng Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF)

A young war evacuee holds his message of peace. Although the Mindanao armed conflict features a low intensity type of warfare, the ‘all-out war’ declarations and skirmishes have caused hundreds of deaths and thousands of displaced persons in 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2008. (Nartea and PhilANSA, copyright 2005)

Prosesong Pangkapayapaan

Upang maresolba ang mga nasabing tunggalian, ang pangunahing pamamaraan ng pamahalaan ng Pilipinas (Government of the Philippines or GPH) ay peace talks o usapang pangkapayapaan. Sinasabayan din ito ng mga programang reporma at pangkaunlaran sa mga apektadong lugar. Gumagampit pa rin ng pwersang militar and GPH ayon sa Internal Peace and Security Plan ng Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP). Ang kabuuang stratehiyang pangkapayapaan at seguridad ng kasalukuyang administrasyon ay nakalathala sa “Chapter 9 Peace and Security” ng Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016.

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Govt, MILF, CPP-NPA-NDF: Declare a peace day ceasefire!

September 01, 2011

photo copyrighted to PhilANCA and Gil Nartea

KILOS PARA SA KAPAYAPAAN AT KATARUNGAN (KILOS!)

Peace is our Right: Declare a Peace Day Ceasefire!     

A Citizens’ Call for a September 21 Ceasefire

 

We—peace advocates from diverse political, cultural, faith and social backgrounds—urge the Government of the Philippines and the CPP-NPA-NDF to declare a 24-hour ceasefire on September 21. Especially on that date, the ongoing ceasefire between the GPH and the MILF must be upheld.

 

We support the peace processes and affirm our collective right to peace – peace that is not just the absence of war but also the absence of structural violence. We believe that peace is freedom from fear, want and humiliation.

 

We draw on the UN-declared International Day of Peace and Non-Violence to highlight the urgent need for peace. The UN General Assembly resolution was passed unanimously in 1981 to give way to a Global Day of Ceasefire. Until now, an annual peace day ceasefire has never been realized in the Philippines.

 

As we appeal for a ceasefire day, we ask for a million supporters for the peace processes through the One Million Voices for Peace Campaign (OMV). From August to December the OMV campaign will launch photo petitions, Facebook likes, fun runs, local mobilizations and celebrations, film screenings, sports events, indigenous rituals and forums to be held in different communities, regions and key cities nationwide.

 

What difference can one day of ceasefire make? Clearly, it is the difference between life and death at the battlefield. But more importantly, a day of peace is a ray of hope for the Filipino people. It is a day that makes us all believe that—in the brief moment when guns are silenced—peace is possible. A day of ceasefire gives us a glimpse of what we expect to attain in our lifetimes, a just and sustainable peace… freedom from violence in whatever form.

 

The Filipino people can take a day of respite from all the violence and take the time to reflect on and commit to peace. They can be nourished by a day of ceasefire for as the struggle for towards peace continues thereafter.

 

WE SUPPORT THE PEACE PROCESSES. WE WANT A JUST AND LASTING PEACE. DECLARE CEASEFIRE ON PEACE DAY!

Kilos para sa Kapayapaan at Katarungan (KILOS!) is the broadest coming together of the Philippine civil society organizations working toward a just and lasting peace in the country. KILOS! Is a concerted effort at  engaging the different stakeholders talking at the peace tables and the larger Philippine society. Its main convenors are network of networks from peace civil society organizations: Mindanao Peaceweavers, Boses Mindanaw, Waging Peace Philippines – GPPAC Southeast Asia, Philippine Ecumenical Peace Platform, Indigenous Peoples Network, and the Sulong CARHRIHL Network.

 

Give Peace A Shot is a photo petition: 1) supporting the peace talks; 2) popularizing conflict and peace issues in the Philippines; and 3) calling for a peace day (21 Sept) ceasefire declaration from all sides. Click the image to view the campaign site.

 

 


 

(NOTE: Please contact the GenPeace secretariat (generationpeacenetwork@gmail.com or +6324266064) if you would like to join the call for a September 21 Peace Day Ceasefire)  Read the rest of this entry

E-Book: Mindanao Report 2011 (SAIS – John Hopkins University)

School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

“Although the situation in Mindanao is sometimes compared to other recent secessionist conflicts in the world such as Kosovo’s struggle against Serbia and the secession of southern Sudan, there are some significant differences. At least since the overthrow of the Marcos dictatorship in 1986, the Philippines has been a largely democratic country, in marked contrast to Slobodan Milosevic’s Serbia or Omar Al-Bashir’s Sudan. Yet, as Kirk Donahoe points out, there remains a democratic deficit in the Philippines that serves as an obstacle to the establishment of lasting peace. Not unlike a lot of other democratic regimes, both new and old, the Philippines has alternated since 1986 between populist regimes and the domination of government affairs by a few prominent families who constitute an entrenched political elite, accompanied by a highly fragmented political party system.” –Excerpt from the Mindanao Report 2011 (downloadable e-book) Read the rest of this entry

PEACEDAYPOSTCARD, A GenPeace Flickr Project

PEACEDAYPOSTCARD: A GenPeace Flickr Project

GenPeace spearheads the 2011 Peace Day celebration in the Philippines. To start off the activities, we are launching the PEACEDAYPOSTCARD project. An online initiative to design and send out peace day postcards to your friends and colleagues. Visit GenPeace.tk for updates on the latest youth peace initiatives for the month-long celebration.

21 September is the International Day of Peace set by the United Nations. The 2011 theme is:

“MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD”

Join this Peace Day Flickr Project:

STEP 1. Upload a Peace Photo/Design on Flickr.
STEP 2. Put the tag: PEACEDAYPOSTCARD (no spaces, all caps)
STEP 3. Email your design to your friends and greet them come 21 September.

Spread the love, spread the peace! Visit the GenPeace Flickr site for more info.

GenPeace discusses peace with MILF

News item mirrored from the Luwaran website. Credits: Aiman A. Yusoph (Luwaran contributor) The main news link can be found here.

 

June 6, 2011 – The Generation Peace Youth Network or GenPeace led by its Head of Secretariat and Program Coordinator Nikki Delfin of Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute and Mirma Mae C. Tica, Program Coordinator Center for Peace Education Miriam College, paid a courtesy call on June 5 on the Moro Islamic Liberation Front Vice-Chairman for Political Affairs Ghazali Jaafar at his office in Simuay, Sultan Kudarat. Also included in the meeting was the local partners of GenPeace in Cotabato City and Maguindanao such as the United Youth for Peace and Development, Tiyakap Kawagib- community based human rights defenders and Bangsamoro Youth Assembly.

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14 Key Features that Define a Successful Insurgency

by SEANGOURLEY on DECEMBER 21, 2009 (from SeanGourley.com)

photo copyrighted to Gil Nartea/PHILANSA

Insurgencies are by their very nature difficult to understand. However each time an attack is launched and every time an IED explodes we start to know a little more about the structure of an insurgency. If we combine together enough of these attacks we start to build up a mosaic picture of the insurgency. Their actions can start to be defined mathematically and we can work backwards from these signatures to understand the fundamental forces that underlie the insurgency. This is exactly what we did in our latest research study “Common Ecology Quantifies Human Insurgency“.

With these models we can for the first time quantitatively understand more about what makes an insurgency successful. From our analysis and modeling we find that there are 14 key characteristics that define a successful insurgent ecosystem; these are listed below with a short name to describe the feature.

Many body: There are many more autonomous insurgent groups operating within conflicts than we had previously thought. For example there are 100+ autonomous groups operating in Iraq (as of 2006).

Fluidity: The insurgents are loosely grouped together to form fluid networks with short half-lives. This is very different from the rigid hierarchical networks that have been proposed for insurgent groups.

Redundancy: If we remove the strongest group from the system another group will rise to replace the previous strongest group

Splinter: When a group is broken it does not generally split in half but instead shatters into multiple pieces

Redistribute: When a group is broken the components are redistributed amongst the other groups in the system. The redistribution is biased towards the most successful remaining groups.

Snowball: The strongest groups grow fastest

Tall poppy: The strongest groups are the predominant targets for opposition forces

Internal competition: There is direct competition amongst insurgent groups for both resources and media exposure. They are competing with each other in addition to fighting the stronger counterinsurgent forces.

Independent co-ordination: Autonomous groups act in a coordinated fashion as a result of the competition that exists between them.

Emergent structure: Attacks in both Iraq and Colombia become ‘less random’ and more coordinated over time

Evolution: The strategies employed by the groups evolve over time where successful groups/strategies survive and unsuccessful strategies/groups are replaced.

High dimensional: Connection occurs over high dimensions (i.e. Internet, cell phone etc) and is not dominated by geographic connections.

Non-linear: It is approximately 316* times harder to kill 100 people in an attack than it is to kill 10 people. (*Results for a conflict with alpha=2.5).

Independent clones: the fundamental structure and dynamics of insurgent groups is largely independent of religious, political, ideological or geographic differences.

What can we learn from insurgents? Should the US military adopt more of these principles? Can we apply these organizational characteristics to other problems? You can read more about the research over at the TED blog, including the in depth interview I did with them.

Editor’s Note: The Bangsamoro armed struggle, successful or not? Let’s discuss in the comments section.